A Post-Product World

In a post-product world, the digital twin becomes the instance of truth, not the physical product itself. (Source: Solidworks) - image

The manufacturing plant of the future will produce not products but experience. If you take the new the robots for mobility – self-driving cars – they’re connected machines. Where does the value come from – the chassis and four wheels – or does it come from the connected services? Those connected services are what we call the experience.

The customer seeks the service, not the product. The value to the customer is coming from the experience of using the car, not from the car itself. Those who succeed in the 21st Century will be those who provide change by offering a new type of experience. This is what makes the 21st Century different from the 20th Century. Millennials Are Ready for a Post-Product World.To some extent, the post-product world is a generational issue. Millennials get the notion that products are essentially experience. For Gen Xers and Boomers, the concept takes some getting used to. Many Millennials used shared rides during their college years. They understand the positive economics of not owning a car.The diminishing sales of CDs is another example of experience over products. My Millennial kids are perfectly content not owning any of the music they listen to, and they’ve taught their Boomer old man that CDs are a clunky way to consume music. I now have countless albums in my Amazon Prime collection. I pay a monthly fee for access, it’s far less than I used spend buying CDs. full article 


AI (Artificial Intelligence) as Job Helper Rather Than Job Usurper

There’s a fear that AI is going to take over our jobs – and with the advent of everything from self-driving cars to artificial customer service agents, it’s a valid concern. It’s especially fair when McKinsey, one of the most trusted global management consulting firms, predicts that as many as 800 million full-time employees could have their work displaced by 2030 due to automation

Yet, that data point alone is not reality. In fact, with the following statistics next to it, we can paint a much better picture for the future of work. According to the same McKinsey report: 

  • Less than 5 percent of occupations consist of activities that can be fully automated
  • In about 60 percent of occupations, only one-third of tasks could be automated 

IT professionals are certainly up for it. Because while their jobs are becoming more complex and time consuming, their numbers in business are not increasing to balance this growth. The principal value of AI in IT is that it can help predict problems rather than just react to them – i.e. prevent problems rather than just attempt to mitigate them. more at Forbes

Release of Regional Plan Modification for Public Review and Comment

Los Angeles Basin Regional Planning Unit releases Regional Plan Modification for Public Review and Comment

The Workforce Development Boards (WDBs) of Los Angeles County are seeking public input on modifications to the region’s Workforce Development Plan.   The Draft Modification to the Los Angeles Basin Regional Planning Unit Regional Workforce Development Plan 2017-2020 is open for public review and public comments through Friday, March 8, 2019

Background: The LA Basin Regional Planning Unit is comprised of seven local Workforce Development Boards (WDBs) including:  City of Los Angeles WDB, County of Los Angeles WDB, Foothill WDB, Pacific Gateway (City of Long Beach) WDB, South Bay Workforce Investment Board, Southeast Los Angeles County WDB, and Verdugo WDB. The Four year Regional Workforce Development Plan is required under federal and state laws and is subject to the Governor’s approval. The Regional Plan Modification is specifically required to determine how the seven Workforce Development Boards plan to: 

  • Align, coordinate, and integrate reentry and workforce services to the formerly incarcerated and other justice-involved individuals;
  • Comply with State Plan guidance and state law relating to Multi-Craft Core Curriculum (MC3) pre-apprenticeship partnerships;
  •  Conduct a regional self-assessment using Indicators of Regional Coordination and Alignment to determine regional implementation progress in achieving the objectives of the California State Workforce Development Plan.

During the months of October through December 2018, an extensive stakeholder public input process was conducted within the City of Los Angeles and the six partner Workforce Development Board areas regarding the Regional Plan Modification and the Local Plans. 

To make comments regarding the Regional Plan Modification, please email to lacitywibATlacity.org

Comments must be received by 11:59pm (PST) on Friday, March 8, 2019

 Draft Regional Plan Modifications for Review

Prepping the Workforce for Smart Automation

Companies can ensure successful deployment of automation by getting buy-in from the workforce and offering retraining. Without the buy-in, workers won’t use the technology.

Companies can reduce the friction of new technology deployment by using collaborative approaches that can produce an abundance of opportunities for the existing workforce. The solution involves a number of strategies, including, gaining buy-in from the company’s workforce, making the new technology familiar, repositioning the workforce infrastructure, and creating retraining programs.

Craig Salvalaggio, VP of Applied Manufacturing Technologies will discuss these strategies in the session, Leading the Change: Digital Transformation & the Workforce of the Future, at the Pacific Design and Manufacturing show in Anaheim on Feb. 5, 2019.

Link to article at Design News: