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Verdugo Workforce Development Board Public Meeting – Local Workforce Development Plan 2021-2024

The Verdugo Workforce Development Board (VWDB) has released two draft documents for public review and comment: 1) VWDB Local Workforce Development Plan 2021– 2024 (Draft); 2) Los Angeles Basin Regional Planning Unit (LABRPU):  Regional Workforce Development Plan 2021– 2024 (Draft).

The draft Local Plan establishes the types of workforce development activities that will be offered in the Verdugo Workforce Development Area (VWDA), including programs for unemployed job seekers and youth. The Plan will also include programs to assist local businesses to ensure they have the qualified workforce to meet their organizational needs. The VWDA consists of the cities of Burbank, Glendale and La Cañada Flintridge which is governed by a Joint Powers Agreement that creates the Verdugo Consortium.

The draft Regional Plan articulates how the LABRPU will build intentionality around industry sector engagement, drive workforce development outcomes across multiple jurisdictions, and expand on-ramps to career pathways for individuals who experience barriers to employment..

Download the VWDB Local plan here

Download the draft LABRPU Regional Plan here

Comments, for the Regional Plan, including any disagreements with the plan, are welcome; however, must be received no later than 5:00 p.m. on April 22, 2021. Comments should be emailed to MaryAnn Pranke at MPranke@GlendaleCA.gov.

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Verdugo Jobs Center, Glendale CA – Jobs & Services Information During Covid-19

Covid -19 Information for Workers

Please see our COVID-19 Information for Workers webpage for up-to-date information and resources for job seekers.
Click here for this information


VJC Program Update

To speak to a case manager who can connect you with our career services, please contact us at (818) 937-8000 or AskVJC@glendaleca.gov.


Ransomware will now get priority treatment at the Justice Department

Directive comes as ransomware is exposing the fragility of critical supply chains

Skull and crossbones in binary code

The Justice Department has created a task force to centrally track and coordinate all federal cases involving ransomware or related types of cybercrime, such as botnets, money laundering, and bulletproof hosting.

“To ensure we can make necessary connections across national and global cases and investigations… we must enhance and centralize our internal tracking of investigations and prosecutions of ransomware groups and the infrastructure and networks that allow the threats to persist,” Deputy Attorney General Lisa Monaco told US attorneys throughout the country on Thursday. She issued the directive in a memo that was first reported by Reuters. Investigators in field offices around the country would be expected to share information as well. The new directive applies not just to cases or investigations involving ransomware but a host of related scourges, including:

  • Counter anti-virus services
  • Illicit online forums or marketplaces
  • Cryptocurrency exchanges
  • Bulletproof hosting services
  • Botnets
  • Online money laundering services

full story here at Ars Technica

Medtech Needs to Reconsider Its Approach to Cybersecurity

The rise of connected medical devices demands a more proactive approach to cybersecurity. 

Connected medical devices have become essential for modern healthcare. Their prevalence has improved healthcare immensely but also brought an increased threat of cyber attacks. Last year saw a 55% increase in cybersecurity attacks on healthcare providers in the United States alone. With patient data, health records, and critical infrastructure at risk—and connected devices only set to become more widespread and complex—the industry needs to reconsider its approach to cybersecurity protection. . . . .

As many healthcare organizations rush to adopt connected solutions, however, many are having to reflect on the cybersecurity implications of connectivity. With HCOs encountering a near 50% increase  in cyberattacks by the end of 2020, the need to better address vulnerabilities in digital health systems is more pressing than ever. Cyberattacks aren’t just becoming more frequent, however; they’re also becoming more sophisticated. Recent years have seen a range of new threats come to the fore: 18 zero-day vulnerabilities—codenamed Ripple 20 —were identified recently by Cybersecurity business JSOF, while a range of vulnerabilities in IPNet Software, named URGENT/11, poses a particular threat to the healthcare industry according to FDA. . . . . full story here


Technology: The Full story of the Stunning RSA Hack Can Finally Be Told

In 2011, Chinese spies stole the crown jewels of cybersecurity—stripping protections from firms and government agencies worldwide. Here’s how it happened.

“. . . . THE RSA BREACH, when it became public days later, would redefine the cybersecurity landscape. The company’s nightmare was a wake-up call not only for the information security industry—the worst-ever hack of a cybersecurity firm to date—but also a warning to the rest of the world . . . .” full story here at Wired

Want a Job in Mechanical Engineering? Here Are 20 Top Companies

The employment of mechanical engineers is projected to grow 9 percent from 2016 to 2026, according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics. That’s about the same as the average for all occupations. But this only shows one dimension of the employment picture for mechanical engineers. The profession continues as one of the top job placement careers. When you get out of college you’re almost certain to get a job.

The states and districts that pay mechanical engineers the highest mean salary are New Mexico ($114,420), District of Columbia ($112,240), Maryland ($109,800), California ($107,920), and Alaska ($103,360).

We’ve listed some of the top employers in the slideshow. Some of them are a bit surprising: While we might not think of these companies as mechanical hardware companies, indeed, they employ an army of MEs . . . . full story here


VWDBB Executive Committee Meeting – June 2, 2021

The next Executive Committee Meeting will be held on June 2, 2021 at 8am.  VWDB meetings are open to the public. Any member of the public who wishes to participate must contact Diana Antonio at least 48 hours before the meeting date to receive meeting call in information. 

The meeting will begin promptly at 8:00 A.M.

 RSVP to: Diana Antonio @ (818) 937-8081, dantonioATglendaleca.gov 

Click here to download Agenda and Minutes of last meeting

Technology: We could see federal regulation on face recognition as early as next week

5-21-21: Amazon and others are indefinitely suspending police use of face recognition products, but proposed legislation could make bans bigger or more permanent.

On May 17, Amazon announced it would extend its moratorium indefinitely, joining competitors IBM and Microsoft in self-regulated purgatory. The move is a nod at the political power of the groups fighting to curb the technology—and recognition that new legislative battle grounds are starting to emerge. Many believe that substantial federal legislation is likely to come soon. 

“People are exhausted” – The past year has been pivotal for face recognition, with revelations of the technology’s role in false arrests, and bans on it put in place by almost two dozen cities and seven states across the US. But the momentum has been shifting for some time.

In 2018, AI researchers published a study comparing the accuracy of commercial facial recognition software from IBM, Microsoft, and Face++. Their work found that the technology identified lighter-skinned men much more accurately than darker-skinned women; IBM’s system scored the worst, with a 34.4% difference in error rate between the two groups. Also in 2018, the ACLU tested Amazon’s Rekognition and found that it misidentified 28 members of Congress as criminals—an error disproportionately affecting people of color. The organization wrote its own open letter to Amazon, demanding that the company ban government use of the technology, as did the Congressional Black Caucus—but Amazon made no changes. . . . full story here at MIT Technology Review


RESCHEDULED! – Glendale Tech on Tap Meetup: NFT’s, Blockchain & Crytocurrency 101, Online Event Thursday JULY 8, 2021

Want to learn more about NFT’s, Blockchain, and Crypto? Thinking of entering the “crypto space”? Join our special guest speakers, Armen Chircorian and Levon Muradian of pxmlmade, to discuss the future integration of NFT’s, Blockchain, and Cryptocurrencies, into products, artworks, music, web applications, and more! In this month’s Tech on Tap event, our guest speakers will highlight the research needed before entering the “crypto space,” the current investments being made into developing second lifeworlds with NFT’s and blockchain, and how the world is utilizing cryptocurrencies as the vessel in an ever-evolving frontier – the new internet. Sign up today!

Thursday, May 27, 2021, 1:00pm to 2:30pm online

Go to Meetup dot com to register for event


World’s First Fully-Recyclable Electronic Transistor Produced By 3D Printers at Duke University

image recyclable electronic transistor


Engineers at Duke University have developed the world’s first fully recyclable printed electronics. Their recycling process recovers nearly 100% of the materials used—and preserves most of their performance capabilities for reuse. By demonstrating a crucial and relatively complex computer component—the transistor—created with three carbon-based inks, the researchers hope to inspire a new generation of recyclable electronics.

“Silicon-based computer components are probably never going away, and we don’t expect easily recyclable electronics like ours to replace the technology and devices that are already widely used,” said Aaron Franklin, the Addy Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering at Duke. “But we hope that by creating new, fully recyclable, easily printed electronics and showing what they can do, that they might become widely used in future applications.”

Even though the ever-growing pile of discarded electronics is now on the decline, less than a quarter of it each year is recycled, according to a United Nations estimate. Part of the problem is that electronic devices are difficult to recycle. Large plants employ hundreds of workers who hack at bulky devices. But while scraps of copper, aluminum and steel can be recycled, the silicon chips at the heart of the devices cannot. . . . . full story