9 Future of Work Trends Post-COVID-19

32% of organizations are replacing full-time employees with contingent workers as a cost-saving measure

As the pandemic resets major work trends, HR leaders need to rethink workforce and employee planning, management, performance and experience strategies.  The coronavirus pandemic will have a lasting impact on the future of work in nine key ways. The imperative for HR leaders is to evaluate the impact each trend will have on their organization’s operations and strategic goals, identify which require immediate action and assess to what degree these trends change pre-COVID-19 strategic goals and plans.

No. 1: Increase in remote working. No. 2: Expanded data collection. No. 3: Contingent worker expansion. No. 4: Expanded employer role as social safety net . . . . see full article


Entertainment Industry Depends a Great Deal on Display Technology: Here Are 16 Trends

image Corning In Vehicle Curved Display

The global display market is expected to grow to roughly $733 B in 2022, more than double the amount just 8 years ago, according to Grand View Research.

To help cover the space, the Society for Information Display (SID) hosts the annual Display Week symposium and tradeshow. Now in its 57th year, the event features an early look at advances in solid-state lighting, OLED, microLED, AR/VR/MR, printed displays, auto tech, e-paper, digital signage wearables, and more.

Like most shows, Display Week 2020 was delivered in a virtual setting. This may not have been a bad thing as the show garnished significant representation from the entire display industry, unlike in previous years when a majority of the attendees were from North America due to cost reasons.  

The gallery at link lists the leading technology and a sampling of products from this year’s symposium.

click to go to gallery and full article


When Will Californians Start Spending Again? – Virtual Event

Tuesday, October 13, 1:00PT

California isn’t just the world’s fifth largest economy—it’s also a global capital of consumer culture. And now its culture, and the everyday habits of its people, are being profoundly disrupted by the pandemic and its associated economic collapse. A sudden, sharp decline in consumer satisfaction has laid open the profound fragility of the California economy. How is COVID-19 changing the way Californians participate in the economy, particularly in the counties hit hardest by the pandemic? How can California bounce back from COVID? And what might Californians’ changing feelings about consumer culture portend for the rest of the country?

Cameron Shelton, director of the Lowe Institute of Political Economy at Claremont McKenna College and a lead investigator in the California Consumer Sentiment Indices, visits Zócalo to explore Californians’ rapidly changing feelings about consumerism.

Click here to register


Opinion Piece : New Technologies Should Be Regulated by Government — Not by Those Who Profit

by historian and journalist Peter Montague

Between 1972 and 1995, Congress supported its own in-house think tank called the Office of Technology Assessment, or OTA. The Congress defunded OTA in 1995, thus causing it to lose much of its capacity to foresee and forestall environmental and social harm that could be avoided or mitigated by sensible government policies and actions. During its brief existence, OTA produced 750 high-quality reports on a wide range of problems that Congress was trying to understand and resolve, such as job loss from automation, the benefits and costs of mammograms, the feasibility and cost of the Strategic Defense Initiative to shoot down incoming nuclear-armed missiles, and the accuracy and reliability of lie-detector tests.

Now Congressmen Mark Takano (D-California) and Sean Casten (D-Illinois) have proposed legislation to restore OTA . . . .

. . . The market is not going to solve the lasers-pointed-at-airplanes problem. Wall Street is not going to fix the climate emergency or control the proliferation of nuclear weapons or require that plastics be made biodegradable so they do not accumulate in the environment. Corporate managers may personally desire to be “socially responsible,” but so long as they answer to shareholders expecting a hefty return on investment, they will pursue technologies that increase their profits, regardless of their ill effects on workers, community and the natural world.

[some complain that] OTA reports are biased against the rapid introduction of new technologies, which many believe are essential for growing the economy  to avoid recession or depression. . . . technology corporations may not find it in their interests to have Congress well-informed about the pros and cons of various regulatory possibilities, so restoring OTA would almost certainly require a coordinated citizen  to make it happen.

full article


Verdugo Jobs Center, Glendale CA – Jobs & Services Information During Covid-19

Covid-19 Assistance Program

The VJC continues to offer its COVID-19 assistance program for workers who access our employment services.
Click here  to learn more about this program.


Covid -19 Information for Workers

Please see our COVID-19 Information for Workers webpage for up-to-date information and resources for job seekers.
Click here for this information


VJC Program Update

To help protect the health and safety of our community, the VJC continues to provide services virtually. Our job search area is closed to the public. To speak to a case manager who can connect you with our career services, please contact us at (818) 937-8000 or AskVJC@glendaleca.gov.


New Training Opportunity for People with Disabilities

Individuals with disabilities are invited to apply to participate in our free Safety CQIA training program.
Click here to view the flyer.

Software Developer Drought: Where are you in Demand?

With an increasing need for software by non-tech companies, a developer drought is growing outside of Silicon Valley.

Turns out there’s a major need for software developers outside of the traditional geo-center of Silicon Valley. Despite COVID-19, states in the US heartland are actively hiring developers. Plus, professionals on the West Coast are reassessing work-life opportunities and exploring start-up prospects outside the Valley and other tech hotspots.

This isn’t a shift to remote workers. In July and August, 92% of software developer job ads on three leading employment sites were for work-on-premises jobs. Apparently, employers are slow to embrace remote working.

The data comes from Mendix, a Siemens business involved in low-code application development. The company recently launched the Mendix 2020 Software Developer Drought Index, an effort to track hiring shortages for developers on the US county and state levels. click here for full article . . .