Companies Start to Think Remote Work Isn’t So Great After All

Projects take longer. Collaboration is harder. And training new workers is a struggle. ‘This is not going to be sustainable.’

Four months ago, employees at many U.S. companies went home and did something incredible: They got their work done, seemingly without missing a beat. Executives were amazed at how well their workers performed remotely, even while juggling child care and the distractions of home. Twitter Inc. and Facebook Inc., among others, quickly said they would embrace remote work . . . . Read full article here at WSJ

3 Mistakes Businesses Make During a Crisis

No business is immune to a crisis, but some recover better than others by avoiding these business mistakes.


Throughout the course of any technology business–from start-ups to established businesses–periodically, crisis hits. These crises could be related to finances, a key employee leaving, industry changes, and so on. There are three mistakes that most often affect a company’s ability to cope with and recover from a crisis.

Mistake #1 – Dissemination of Information

When things go south, there are often two information-related mistakes management makes. First, they ignore sharing information with employees, which churns the rumor mill. In many cases, the rumors that come about are far worse than reality and can lead to poor decision-making further down in the business structure. It is incredibly important to share information as quickly as possible, even if that is simply to state that you have no further information.

Second, when management does decide to tell employees what is going on, they often do not have a . . . . click here for full story

Important Updates from LA County Economic Development Corporation

LA Covid-19 Community Connectory

Due to COVID-19, employers and workers in our region are facing challenges of epic proportions.

During these unprecedented times, the LAEDC has established this LA Covid-19 Community Connectory which seeks to provide crucial resources for vulnerable residents, small businesses, and nonprofits. The Community Connectory:

  • Engages LAEDC’s award-winning staff of business assistance and layoff avoidance professionals to directly help employers overcome challenges, retain staff and position for economic recovery.
  • Spotlights a growing array of financial resources that directly support individuals, as well as programs to help businesses and community-based organizations.
  • Provides frequent analysis and economic outlooks from LAEDC’s Institute for Applied Economics to help all people in our region plan for economic recovery.

All the services of LA Community Connectory are provided at no charge, in keeping with LAEDC’s public-benefit mission, and true to our history of helping save over 240,000 direct jobs in LA County over the past 20 years.

Click here to go to site for more information and to register for services

City of Glendale’s Tech – July 21, 2020 at 4PM – Zoom Webinar

Glendale Tech on Tap

The City of Glendale’s Tech on Tap event, “Virtually Meet & Greet our New Tech Accelerators,”  is July 21. This is the City’s fourth virtual Tech on Tap event and will feature speakers from Glendale’s two new Tech Accelerator Operators — Omkar Kulkarni from KidsX Health Accelerator and Hambarzum Kaghketsyan from HeroHouse Glendale Gateway Program, for a *virtual* afternoon Meet & Greet! The Meet & Greet will be followed by a Q&A session, where all participants are encouraged to participate to learn more about these two operators.

Register here

How ArtificiaI Intelligence (AI), Machine Learning (ML), and Augmented Reality (AR) Will Change the Face of Design

The combination of artificial intelligence (AI), machine learning (ML), and augmented reality (AR) will change the face of design in the not-so-distant future.

I truly believe that the combination of AI and AR is going to change the way in which we interface with our systems, the world, and each other. . . . we are still in the very early days of AI and AR. When Charles Babbage (1791–1871) commenced work on his Analytical Steam Engine in the 1830s, he thought of this machine only in the context of performing mathematical calculations, which he very much disliked doing by hand. It’s fascinating to me that Babbage’s assistant, Augusta Ada Lovelace (1815–1852), mused on something akin to AI. In fact, Ada wrote about the possibility of computers using numbers as symbols to represent things like musical notes, and she went so far as to speculate of machines one day “having the ability to compose elaborate and scientific pieces of music of any degree of complexity or extent.” . . . . let’s consider the AI project I’m working on at the moment. This is going to be mounted on my vacuum cleaner. It’s going to employ a 3-axis accelerometer to monitor the vibrations, and it will use green and red LEDs to tell me if the container is OK or if it needs to be emptied. Just for giggles and grins, I want to equip it with Wi-Fi. Thus, on the remote chance my son decides to hoover the house while I’m at work, my gizmo can send a message to my smartphone saying “The bag needs changing” so I can call my son and pass on the good news. . . . . full story here

Webinar: Women in Entertainment- Community RoundTable: THE NEW FACE OF ENTERTAINMENT – July 23rd, 12:00 PM

July 23rd, 12:00 PM – ZoomAs COVID-19 has changed our traditional Entertainment world we will listen to a set of panelists in the industry brainstorm. Join us to discuss how new ways to bring Entertainment to the public has started 

Women in Entertainment is a topic that brings out so many questions. At NEW-WBC we want to open the conversation for women who own micro to small businesses in the entertainment industry to have a place to bring their concerns, open the discussion, and look for alternatives. What is our next step? We brought a group of entrepreneurs to the Community Roundtable to share their experiences. What is our expectation? To open the opportunity to create a group of professionals in the entertainment industry who will work together to open the space for more women.At our center we provide the tools and skills to make businesses succeed. In addition we want to open a platform for women in entertainment to discuss new opportunities, share success and help each other.

Click here to register and see list of speakers

California’s Powerful, But Obscure, Answer to the Covid Jobs Crisis – Workforce Development Boards

Zocalo Public Square, by MICHAEL BERNICK | JULY 10, 2020

You May Never Have Heard of Your Local Workforce Development Boards, but They Know How to Move the State Forward

A “Now Hiring” sign at a CVS Pharmacy during the coronavirus outbreak in San Francisco. California’s unemployment rate nearly tripled in April because of the economic fallout from coronavirus pandemic. Courtesy of Jeff Chiu/Associated Press.

We can bring jobs back to California, and we can do it right now. The latest employment numbers should provide the sense of urgency. An additional 287,354 new unemployment insurance claims were filed just for the week ending June 20, bringing the total to more than 6.7 million claims filed in California since mid-March, and $33.5 billion in unemployment benefits paid. Our California economy is now surviving in good part on unemployment insurance payments.

To understand how to respond to the current predicament, Californians should turn to the front lines of employment: California’s network of 45 local workforce development boards. Though these boards are not well known, they represent the heart of the public workforce system in California. Overseen by locally appointed business and labor representatives, workforce development boards administer the bulk of the federal and state job training and placement funds in the state, totaling more than $1 billion. They interact daily with job seekers and local businesses. 

Fresno’s board is one of the larger bodies, with a budget of nearly $19 million, 31 direct staff, and more than 200 contractors involved in job training and placement. It serves an area population of just under 1 million, with unemployment and poverty rates that have been well above the state average for decades. Blake Konczal, the board’s executive director since 2002, started his career during the economic downturn in 1992, providing placement services to laid-off Southern California aerospace workers. He has experience with several other downturns since then and is active in current Central Valley recovery efforts.

In my recent conversations with Konczal and other board directors, they emphasize that there is no silver bullet for recovery. Rather, their experiences with the current and previous downturns point to a series of five strategies to bring back California jobs. click here for full story at Zocalo Public Square