Why U.S. Startup Rules Don’t Work in Africa & What We Can Learn From Them – Webinar February 25, 2021, sponsored by Glendale Tech on Tap

Glendale Tech on Tap will sponsor this Zoom event with speaker Maggie Shih, who is a technology veteran and co-founder, executive, advisor, and product leader. Maggie has over 20 years of software and mobile product development and business management experiences with companies ranging from start-ups to multi billion dollars.

Thursday, February 25, 2021 from 3:00 to 4:00pm. The event will take place virtually via zoom. Please sign up for the event via Eventbrite: https://www.eventbrite.com/e/why-us-startup-rules-dont-work-in-africa-and-what-can-we-learn-from-them-tickets-141206581687


The Future of Medical Research and Treatment: Impacts of the Pandemic

Join Via Zoom for a Virtual Conference: Thursday, March 18, 2021; 11:00am–12:15pm

From initial research, to testing potential cures and preventions, and now revolutionizing supply chains and distribution, the industry made front page news weekly while both experts and the general public followed developments like their lives depended on it – and they did.  

The past year’s innovations have accelerated the growth of an already burgeoning industry, with bioscience activity in Los Angeles County on the rise long before the pandemic. Medical research is constantly being impacted by new technology, and the typical process of FDA approval and access progress more rapidly each day. We’ll analyze how the events of the past year sped up growth of the industry and what long-term impacts the pandemic will have on medical treatment development, approval, and distribution.

During these unprecedented times, the future can be intimidating, but the bioscience industry provides a progressive pathway to developing treatments and cures across the disease spectrum. The LAEDC is focusing on timely research to provide updated regional insights to inform the bioscience stakeholders and decisionmakers about the state of the industry including challenges, opportunities, and how a year with the pandemic will affect future growth. Register for Event Here


LAEDC Economic Forecast Forum – February 17, 2021 8:30am – 11:30am

Register Here

The LAEDC Annual Economic Forecast has been a catalyst for progress for the past two decade. As L.A.’s most iconic and highly anticipated forecast event, it offers attendees valuable insights on upcoming opportunities and challenges for the region.

 
The events of the past year have laid bare the inequities of both the national and local economies. The lived experiences of the millions of Americans who have found themselves unemployed during the pandemic are a stark contrast to the “record setting” levels of Wall Street. The 2021 Economic Forecast will focus on “A Tale of Two Recoveries.” — Go to website to register and learn about keynote speakers, break-out sessions, etc.


Uber and Lyft’s Gig Work Law Could Expand Beyond California

The companies are backing proposals in other states that would give workers the ability to form unions—but still consider them contractors, not employees.

In November, GIG companies including Uber, Lyft, DoorDash, and Instacart helped pass California’s Proposition 22, effectively writing their own labor law. Now the companies plan to bring similar legislation elsewhere.

Last month, the companies launched a group called the App-Based Work Alliance to support their agenda. Industry-supported bills in the works in New York state and Illinois would, like the California ballot measure, deny gig workers status as employees, and the workers’ compensation, paid family leave, sick pay, unemployment insurance, and minimum wage guarantees that come with it.

But the bills could give gig workers the right to form something resembling a union, allowing workers to bargain with multiple employers to create wage floors and standards. US workers in trucking, auto manufacturing, and grocery stores have participated in types of industry-wide bargaining, though the arrangement is more common in Europe.

The scheme has divided labor advocates. Some labor allies say that allowing gig workers to unionize would give them a much-needed seat at the table, in an industry where work and wages are dictated by algorithm and where access to the “bosses”—the companies that pay their wages—is hard to come by. Gaining the right to collectively bargain, these people say, is a vital first step in making the low-wage, high-turnover job more fair.

Others say that allowing gig companies to continue to treat their workers as independent contractors is a mistake. Legislation giving workers the right to a union without employment status would effectively be a government rubber stamp to gig companies’ business models, “in which the most low-income workers don’t have access to basic safety net benefits,” says Veena Dubal, a professor of labor law at the University of California, Hastings College of the Law. full story here at Wired


Pandemic accelerating the move to a hybrid workplace

As employees swap the corporate office for the home office, business leaders are forced to re-examine the business model and strategic priorities.

The pandemic has amplified several trends already prevalent in the workplace: the growth of the dispersed workforce, the proliferation of digital engagement, and the rise of the subscription economy. Together, they are ushering in an era of a rapidly emerging work environment that promotes business agility and growth through a mix of on-site and remote employees, modern digital experiences, and on-demand access to software and solutions.

Flexible work environments will play a more central role moving forward. As one respondent put it, “remote workers are going to be the new norm for our company.” . . . Equally important to business leaders, employees are onboard with more remote work. According to PwC, almost three quarters (72%) of US employees now want to work remotely at least two days per week, with one third (32%) preferring to never go to the office. Similarly, Gallup reported in April 2020 that 60% of Americans would prefer to continue to work remotely once public health restrictions are lifted. full story here


Medical Device Design: 3 Practical Tips for Great User Interface and User Experience

Virtual Engineering Week speakers from Kablooe Design share practical tips for doing great user interface and user experience (UX/UI) in medical device design. 

If user interfaces on a consumer electronic are unclear, it results in frustration and wasted time. In medical device design, if user interfaces are unclear, results could be far more serious. During BVirtual Engineering Week, During experts from Kablooe Design, a Coon Rapids, MN-based firm, shared key considerations for designing a medical device user interface (UI) and user experience (UX). Link Here


The Future of the Green Economy: A Path to Recovery

LAEDC Presents A Zoom Virtual Conference: Tuesday, December 15, 2020, 11:00am–12:15pm

The green economy has been gaining traction over the last decade as municipalities and governments worldwide have re-evaluated how they “do business” in respect to the environment. From the Paris (Climate) Agreement to “Green New Deals” that have been adopted to policy platforms, the green economy is shaping the future of local, state, and global economies. Now, nearing a year into this pandemic, the green economy is being positioned as part of the solution to an economic recovery. However, the question still remains, “Is the green economy THE path to recovery?”

We’ll take a look at how the move to a more sustainable and renewable economy and environment is impacting the opportunities of tomorrow. And, address concerns on whether it will be enough as we try to jumpstart economic development in our region. more and register


Feds say Facebook broke US law offering permanent jobs to H-1B workers

Under US immigration law, employers must give preference to US workers

Timothy B. Lee-  12/3/2020, for Ars Technica

The United States Department of Justice sued Facebook on Thursday arguing that the social media giant discriminated against US workers by giving preference to Facebook workers on H-1B visas who wanted to transition to permanent jobs at the company.

The H-1B visa program lets foreign workers work at a US company for three years. It can be renewed once. After that, an employer can ask for permission to offer the immigrant a permanent job under the Department of Labor’s PERM certification program. But the employer is supposed to first advertise the job to see if any Americans are available. Only if no qualified Americans apply can the job go to the immigrant.

In its lawsuit, the Justice Department argues that Facebook’s hiring practices made a mockery of these requirements. Most . . . . full story here