Automation and Robotics in Packaging – Oct 1, 2020

Join us for a 60-minute webinar, Automation and Robotics in Packaging, with live Q&A on Thursday, October 1 at 11:00 AM PDT / 2:00 PM EDT.

Visit a packaging trade show and what you’ll see across the floor is hundreds of robots and automated motion systems. Packaging operations have become extended automation systems that require very little manual labor. If the warehouse was the first part of manufacturing operation to go fully automated, the packaging operations are close second.

In this webinar author, robot futurist and changeover wizard John Henry will discuss how robots are currently used to automate packaging and how he expects them to be used in the future.

Click to register and obtain more information


LAEDC Economic Update for Los Angeles County, unemployment, industries and housing

In this LAEDC economic analysis webinar, Shannon Sedgwick, director of LAEDC’s Institute for Applied Economics offers perspective and analysis of the latest labor market and jobs data from California EDD, published 8-24-20. In addition LAEDC economist Tyler Laferriere discusses housing prices and the stock and bond market relative to the economic recession. LAEDC CEO Bill Allen introduces the speakers and provides an overview.


How Much Information Is Too Much Information?

A Zocalo Public Square Event – You Tube Video Stream

The world is projected to generate 90 zettabytes of data this year and the next. That’s more than all the data produced since the arrival of computers, and if we still used DVDs, we’d need 19 trillion to store it all. Swimming in this massive sea of information, humans are easily overwhelmed; studies suggest we avoid important information because it might make us miserable, while seeking out information of dubious value to make ourselves happy.

What information do we need to know? What role should policymakers play in helping us find data that improves our well-being and filter out information—from calorie counts to credit card fees—that wastes our time or even endangers us? Harvard University legal scholar Cass Sunstein, author of “Too Much Information: Understanding What You Don’t Want To Know,” visited Zócalo and the Commonwealth Club to explain how we can make information work for us. This online streamed event was moderated by “WIRED” senior editor Lauren Goode. Read more about our panelists here: https://zps.la/3cjL6OA


AFL-CIO to Host Labor Web Conferences Friday-Monday of Labor Day Week-End

Join AFL-CIO President Richard Trumka for a conversation with union members who are serving on the front lines as we battle COVID-19. From teaching our kids to caring for the sick to serving our communities, these workers will share their personal journeys and discuss why we need to pass the HEROES Act to protect and support those on the job.

LABOR LIVE: FRONT-LINE WORKERS AND COVID-19 – Friday Sept 4, 3pm PT

LABOR LIVE: THE ONGOING ECONOMIC FALLOUT OF COVID-19 – Sat. Sept 5 9am PT

LABOR LIVE: PROTECTING THE U.S. POSTAL SERVICE AND VOTE BY MAIL Sunday Sept 6 3pm PT

LABOR DAY LIVE: A CONVERSATION WITH VICE PRESIDENT JOE BIDEN, Monday, Sept 7, 1:15p PT

Click Here to go to Labor Day Live


From MIT Tech Review: Want consumer privacy? Try China

Forget the idea that China doesn’t care about privacy—its citizens will soon have much greater consumer privacy protections than Americans.

The narrative in the US that the Chinese don’t care about data privacy is simply misguided. It’s true that the Chinese government has built a sophisticated surveillance apparatus (with the help of Western companies), and continues to spy on its citizenry. 

But when it comes to what companies can do with people’s information, China is rapidly moving toward a data privacy regime that, in aligning with the European Union’s GDPR, is far more stringent than any federal law on the books in the US.  full story / podcast here

Prop 22 Lets Voters Weigh in on the Gig Economy of Uber & Lyft

Uber and Lyft drivers use their own vehicles and are paid by the ride, giving rise to the term “gig economy.”

Uber and Lyft contend that they give drivers opportunities to voluntarily supplement their incomes by working whenever it suits them. But, this business model has is unsettled unions and many in government, who contend that it deprives workers of rights and benefits of being on the payroll, such as contributions for Social Security and Medicare benefits and overtime pay. As independent contractors, gig workers also cannot be union members.

Two years ago, the state Supreme Court declared gig work illegal, and the Legislature followed up with measure, Assembly Bill 5, which put the decision into law. Uber and Lyft, responded with a ballot measure, #22 on Nov 3, 2020 ballot, that would exempt them from the Assembly Bill 5 legislation while offering gig workers some employee-lite benefits.

Voters will decide whether gig work is an appropriate new model or an illegal denial of worker rights and counter to state labor law, when they vote on Prop 22 in November.

The Pro Proposistion 22 coalition is comprised of companies employing gig workers, and the anti-Proposition 22 coalition is comprised of unions and many in government. Attorney General Becerra and some city attorneys have now also sued Uber and Lyft for continuing to classify their drivers as independent contractors despite the passage of AB 5.

Recently , San Francisco Superior Court Judge Ethan Schulman ruled against the companies. Judge Schulman said the companies’ employment practices are depriving drivers “of the panoply of basic rights to which employees are entitled under California law.”

Major ‘Milestone’ for Workers as California Judge Rules Uber and Lyft Must Classify Drivers as Employees

In a move that local political leaders and labor rights advocates celebrated as a major win for gig workers, a California judge ruled Monday that the ride-hailing companies Lyft and Uber must classify drivers in the state as employees rather than independent contractors to comply with state law.

“The years-long ploy of these behemoth corporations to stall, obfuscate, and flat-out break the law has failed. There must be no more delays.”
—Art Pulaski, California Labor Federation

San Francisco Superior Court Judge Ethan Schulman’s decision came in a case filed gainst Lyft and Uber in May by California Attorney General Xavier Becerra and the city attorneys of Los Angeles, San Diego, and San Francisco, who accused the companies of violating Assembly Bill 5 (AB 5), which Democratic Gov. Gavin Newsom signed last year.

“The court has weighed in and agreed: Uber and Lyft need to put a stop to unlawful misclassification of their drivers while our litigation continues,” Becerra said in a statement responding to Schulman’s preliminary injunction, which is stayed for 10 days to allow for legal appeals.

“While this fight still has a long way to go, we’re pushing ahead to make sure the people of California get the workplace protections they deserve,” Becerra added. “Our state and workers shouldn’t have to foot the bill when big businesses try to skip out on their responsibilities. We’re going to keep working to make sure Uber and Lyft play by the rules.”

source: https://www.commondreams.org/news/2020/08/11/major-milestone-workers-california-judge-rules-uber-and-lyft-must-classify-drivers

Companies Start to Think Remote Work Isn’t So Great After All

Projects take longer. Collaboration is harder. And training new workers is a struggle. ‘This is not going to be sustainable.’

Four months ago, employees at many U.S. companies went home and did something incredible: They got their work done, seemingly without missing a beat. Executives were amazed at how well their workers performed remotely, even while juggling child care and the distractions of home. Twitter Inc. and Facebook Inc., among others, quickly said they would embrace remote work . . . . Read full article here at WSJ

Important Updates from LA County Economic Development Corporation