Public Sector Training Partnerships Build Power

From building trades apprenticeships to the Culinary Academy of Las Vegas’ casino and hospitality worker training, labor-management partnerships are well regarded for their ability to connect private sector workers to high-paying jobs while ensuring that employers receive a steady stream of well-qualified employees. Yet, policymakers and advocates often pay less attention to existing partnerships between unionized public sector workers and their employers, despite the fact that these workers now account for about half of all union members and that there is a long history of public sector partnerships providing professional development opportunities to workers.1

By expanding the use of public sector labor-management training partnerships, policymakers and unions can help government employers and unions work together to solve challenges and deliver good results for workers, employers, and the public. Labor-management partnerships—independent organizations that unions and employers jointly control—allow partners to collaboratively design and manage workforce training, professional learning, and apprenticeship opportunities. Research finds that these sorts of programs can help employers recruit and retain skilled workers; improve work quality; boost productivity; and strengthen employee relations.2 Public sector training programs are also being used to increase the diversity of the public sector workforce; ensure that government is ready to serve diverse populations; and provide a pathway to a good job for workers, particularly those who face  multiple barriers to finding employment.

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The State of the U.S. Labor Market: Pre-September 2019 Jobs Release

  1. The unemployment rate remains high for young workers.
  2. Younger workers are more likely to work part time for economic reasons
  3. As school enrollment continues to rise, the labor force participation rate for 16- to 22-year-olds continues to decline
  4. Choosing to pursue an education over work experience may come with risks and trade-offs; the college debt burden continues to swell while the body of research on college food insecurity grows.
  5. As anxieties and predictions about the future of work abound, it is crucial that researchers avoid overlooking the young workers who will eventually enter the labor force.

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Employers Used Facebook to Keep Women and Older Workers From Seeing Job Ads

The Federal Government Thinks That’s Illegal.

In a first, the U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission has ruled that companies violated civil rights law through their use of Facebook’s targeting advertising.

Two years ago, ProPublica and The New York Times revealed that companies were posting discriminatory job ads on Facebook, using the social network’s targeting tools to keep older workers from seeing employment opportunities. Then we reported companies were using Facebook to exclude women from seeing job ads. Experts told us that it was most likely illegal. And it turns out the federal government now agrees. A group of recent rulings by the U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission found “reasonable cause” to conclude that seven employers violated civil rights protections by excluding women or older workers or both from seeing job ads they posted on Facebook. full article

Jobs In the News

AT&T has cut more than 23,000 jobs since receiving a big tax cut at the end of 2017, despite lobbying heavily for the tax cut by claiming that it would create 7,000 jobs. AT&T also cut capital spending despite promising $1 billion capital boost. READ REPORT HERE

Two updated energy jobs reports have been released, and they paint a picture of how the last year has affected different energy sectors.

Energy jobs reports say solar dominates coal, but wind is the real winner. Latest report offers a look at how the last year of policy has affected energy jobs. READ REPORT HERE

Employment Policy Conversation Starter: Facebook Co-Founder’s Concern About “Winner-Take-All Economy” and Role of Government in Correcting

Even during this current period of low unemployment and decent economic growth, a huge portion of the population is being left behind. Nearly half of all wage earners today bring in less than $30,000 a year. Last week, the Federal Reserve reported that four in ten Americans don’t have $400 to handle an emergency expense, and 25% of non-retired adults have absolutely no savings or pension to lean on once they stop working. Paying for just the basics, such as rent and medical care, is enormously stressful for many millions—even if they’re employed.

Facebook cofounder Chris Hughes has a $2.5 trillion plan to lift up the working class. Hughes, who made waves with his call to break up Facebook, helps lead the Economic Security Project, which is building support for boosting tax credits for working people.

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A Post-Product World

In a post-product world, the digital twin becomes the instance of truth, not the physical product itself. (Source: Solidworks) - image

The manufacturing plant of the future will produce not products but experience. If you take the new the robots for mobility – self-driving cars – they’re connected machines. Where does the value come from – the chassis and four wheels – or does it come from the connected services? Those connected services are what we call the experience.

The customer seeks the service, not the product. The value to the customer is coming from the experience of using the car, not from the car itself. Those who succeed in the 21st Century will be those who provide change by offering a new type of experience. This is what makes the 21st Century different from the 20th Century. Millennials Are Ready for a Post-Product World.To some extent, the post-product world is a generational issue. Millennials get the notion that products are essentially experience. For Gen Xers and Boomers, the concept takes some getting used to. Many Millennials used shared rides during their college years. They understand the positive economics of not owning a car.The diminishing sales of CDs is another example of experience over products. My Millennial kids are perfectly content not owning any of the music they listen to, and they’ve taught their Boomer old man that CDs are a clunky way to consume music. I now have countless albums in my Amazon Prime collection. I pay a monthly fee for access, it’s far less than I used spend buying CDs. full article