Update from LA Mayor Garcetti re Cover-19

 I want to share a few updates on our actions to protect our city in the midst of this crisis. Please share all of this information with your family and friends.

Across Los Angeles, we just finished up our second weekend staying safer at home. By keeping our distance and changing up our normal routines, millions of us made the choice to do right by our neighbors, our seniors, our loved ones, and our own health. Believe me when I tell you: that decision will save lives.

From the very start of the COVID-19 crisis, we have poured everything we have into our response. Keeping vital services up and running. Strengthening our health care system. Supporting the Angelenos hardest hit by the economic blow from this emergency.

You can continue to find updates and resources at Coronavirus.LACity.org, and make sure you’re signed up for notifications from the City at NotifyLA.org.

click here to go to the full message from Mayor Garcetti.

Stream online! Tuesday, April 14, 2020 — 6:30 PM How Can We Make Farmwork Healthier?

A Zócalo/The California Wellness Foundation Event

Farm work is vital to our society—and dangerous for the people who do it. Farmworkers are exposed to a variety of health hazards: noise, heat, harmful chemicals, and musculoskeletal injuries, to name a few. Farmworkers’ struggles with long hours, low wages, polluted air, overcrowded housing, and frequent relocations often add to their challenges, especially in mental health. What do Californians owe to the laborers who put fruits, vegetables, nuts, and milk on our tables? How are changes in technology and immigration enforcement reshaping the nature of farm work and its health concerns? What progress has been made in protecting the health of farmworkers, and what important steps are regulators or the agricultural industry refusing to take? Organic farmer and artist Nikiko Masumoto, Huron Mayor Rey León, health researcher Chia Thao, and Tania Pacheco-Werner, co-assistant director of the Central Valley Health Policy Institute, visit Zócalo to consider how to make farm work healthier.

Click here to register and obtain information for streaming this on your computer live.

Employers Used Facebook to Keep Women and Older Workers From Seeing Job Ads

The Federal Government Thinks That’s Illegal.

In a first, the U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission has ruled that companies violated civil rights law through their use of Facebook’s targeting advertising.

Two years ago, ProPublica and The New York Times revealed that companies were posting discriminatory job ads on Facebook, using the social network’s targeting tools to keep older workers from seeing employment opportunities. Then we reported companies were using Facebook to exclude women from seeing job ads. Experts told us that it was most likely illegal. And it turns out the federal government now agrees. A group of recent rulings by the U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission found “reasonable cause” to conclude that seven employers violated civil rights protections by excluding women or older workers or both from seeing job ads they posted on Facebook. full article

Jobs In the News

AT&T has cut more than 23,000 jobs since receiving a big tax cut at the end of 2017, despite lobbying heavily for the tax cut by claiming that it would create 7,000 jobs. AT&T also cut capital spending despite promising $1 billion capital boost. READ REPORT HERE

Two updated energy jobs reports have been released, and they paint a picture of how the last year has affected different energy sectors.

Energy jobs reports say solar dominates coal, but wind is the real winner. Latest report offers a look at how the last year of policy has affected energy jobs. READ REPORT HERE

Rise of the Augmented Worker

Augmented reality (AR) technology is beginning to change how workers are trained in education, healthcare, entertainment, and gaming. Now it’s entering manufacturing. In the session, The Rise of the Augmented Worker – How Augmented Reality and Artificial Intelligence Will Revolutionize Manufacturing, Chris Kuntz, VP of marketing at Augmentir explained how training in AR can improve productivity, efficiency, and safety in the manufacturing setting. He also shared insights on how Artificial Intelligence (AI) can be combined with AR to deliver manufacturing knowledge

Transferring Boomer Knowledge to Millennials

One challenge facing manufacturers is the retirement of Baby Boomer. Those skilled workers are leaving the plants with decades of knowledge. “There is a lot of intelligence and expertise in the aging workforce that is leaving,” said Kuntz. “Companies are trying to figure out how to take that knowledge to new younger workers. Yet there is not a lot of insight into how to capture that knowledge.” click here for full article

Employment Policy Conversation Starter: Facebook Co-Founder’s Concern About “Winner-Take-All Economy” and Role of Government in Correcting

Even during this current period of low unemployment and decent economic growth, a huge portion of the population is being left behind. Nearly half of all wage earners today bring in less than $30,000 a year. Last week, the Federal Reserve reported that four in ten Americans don’t have $400 to handle an emergency expense, and 25% of non-retired adults have absolutely no savings or pension to lean on once they stop working. Paying for just the basics, such as rent and medical care, is enormously stressful for many millions—even if they’re employed.

Facebook cofounder Chris Hughes has a $2.5 trillion plan to lift up the working class. Hughes, who made waves with his call to break up Facebook, helps lead the Economic Security Project, which is building support for boosting tax credits for working people.

Link to article

Robots Will Take Jobs From Men, The Young and Minorities

warehouse robots image

THERE’S NO DOUBT technology is shaking up the American workplace. Amazon employs more than 100,000 robots in its US warehouses, alongside more than 125,000 human workers. Sears and Brookstone, icons of brick and mortar retailing, are both bankrupt. But as machines and software get ever smarter, how many more workers will they displace, and which ones?

Economists who study employment have pushed back against recent predictions by Silicon Valley soothsayers like Elon Musk of an imminent tidal wave of algorithmic unemployment. The evidence indicates US workers will instead be lapped by the gentler swells of a gradual revolution in which jobs are transformed piecemeal as machines grow more capable. Now a new study predicts that young, Hispanic, and black workers will be most affected by that creeping disruption. Men will suffer more changes to their work than women.

The analysis from the Brookings Institution suggests that just as the dividends of recent economic growth have been distributed unevenly, so too will the disruptive effects of automation. In both cases, nonwhite, less economically secure workers lose out. full article

The Gender Wage Gap Is Worse Than We Thought

New research shows that the reality of today’s wage gap is more complicated than the figure often bandied about in Washington—“80 cents to a man’s dollar.” In fact, the gap might actually be much worse, yet much simpler to fix, than we assume.

According to a new analysis of historical wage data by the Institute for Women’s Policy Research (IWPR), the oft-cited 20 percent gap, which focuses on short-term earnings, misses the context of women’s lives. When mapped over 15-year periods, the long-term gender earnings gap might widen to as much as 50 percent.

full article here