Apply Now to Participate in Glendale Virtual Pitchfest on June 24, 2020

Local startups are invited to participate in a Virtual Pitchfest on June 24. Ten finalists will compete for a mini-prize package. Preference will be given to Glendale based companies solving COVID-19 related problems.

Application Deadline: May 31, 2020.

Click here for application and more information

City of Glendale Will Launch 2 Accelerators

The City of Glendale received $1 million from the State of California to launch a tech startup accelerator. After feedback from the tech community, start-ups, accelerators and potential operators, the City will launch two new accelerators.

THE CHILDREN’S HOSPITAL LOS ANGELES
KIDSX DIGITAL HEALTH ACCELERATOR
 

Focusing on advancing digital health innovation for pediatric health and healthcare. The program will provide innovation in a field that is very timely and will serve as the first Pediatric-focused digital health accelerator in the world. Pediatric health services include the use of artificial intelligence, gamification, virtual, augmented or mixed reality, mobile apps, voice-enabled services and remote monitoring, among others.

HERO HOUSE GLENDALE 

To implement a non-industry specific “Gateway to LA” program that will focus on international or out-of- state companies looking to expand their product in Southern California. It will also accept applicants from Glendale and/or Southern California. This program will be established by SmartGateVC, and backed by Draper University of Heroes in San Mateo, CA, as well as the Armenian Engineers and Scientists of America.

for more information and to join the city’s accelerator mailing list, click here.

How Are Manufacturers Holding Up During the Pandemic?

Both reshoring and the deployment of automation have become more interesting to respondents. The survey reveals that 64% of manufacturers say they are likely to bring manufacturing production and sourcing back to North America, which is a 10% increase from the same sentiment reported in Thomas’ March survey of manufacturers. Another key finding shows that 25% of US manufacturers are considering expanding industrial automation as a result of COVID-19. . . . . full story click here

Free Webinar: Advanced Generative Design, Thursday May 21, 2020

Advanced Generative Design: A Paradigm to Revolutionize Product Development 

Join us for a 60-minute webinar, “Advanced Generative Design: A Paradigm to Revolutionize Product Development,” with live Q&A on Thursday, May 21 at 11:00 AM PT / 2:00 PM EDT.

Generative design software is creating product shapes that cannot be made through traditional machining or casting. With generative design, you can set the parameters of the object and let the software determine what the product will look like. What we’re seeing is stronger, lighter parts that can only be created through an additive process.

This webinar will provide a vision for how Generative Design, along with technologies like, Simulation, Additive Manufacturing, Advanced Materials, and Artificial Intelligence will converge into an environment that will dramatically change how we develop products and bring them to market.

When you attend this webinar, you will learn:

  • What generative design is and why it is so important?
  • Why it is now so relevant?
  • What technologies that will enable it?
  • Who should use these tools?
  • What should my company plan to do about it?

Click here to go to event registration

Tech Companies Still Fighting COVID-19

Technology companies are bringing their expertise to the fight against coronavirus. This week we saw even more companies contributing to the effort.

Optima: The need for specific consumer goods and hygiene products, pharmaceuticals and medical technology has increased exponentially. The broad-based Optima Group has responded to this development by supporting customers with special machine solutions which can be flexibly adapted to suit the new market requirements. A new website provides information about the portfolio. Anchor Harvey, an aluminum forging company with more than 30 years of experience forging products for the medical industry, has announced the expansion of the company’s medical industry forging capabilities to meet the increasing demand for emergency medical supplies during COVID-19. MaskForce Consortium: Recently, a consortium of Milwaukee-area manufacturers teamed up to help alleviate the shortage of N95 masks that hospital workers desperately need today. The group, which calls itself MaskForce, has accomplished a lot in only three weeks. They collaboratively designed an innovative mask with a replaceable filter that can be worn for hours without discomfort. One partner helped to speed regulatory approvals and sourced filter media. And another has set up a manufacturing cell to produce at least 50,000 masks. Stratasys, Inc. and Origin have signed an agreement in which Stratasys will market and promote Origin 3D-printed nasopharyngeal swabs to healthcare providers and other testing centers in the U.S. Origin plans to increase production from 100,000 per week to over a million per week in May.. more and details at link

California Sues Uber and Lyft to Classify Drivers as Employees

The suit threatens to upend the business models of Uber and Lyft, which view themselves as tech-y intermediaries between people who want rides and people willing to drive them. An analysis by Barclays estimates that treating California drivers as employees would cost Uber $506 million and Lyft $290 million annually; neither company is profitable.

THE STATE OF California and three of its biggest cities have sued Uber and Lyft for misclassifying hundreds of thousands of drivers as independent contractors, in violation of a new state law. The suit, under a law known as Assembly Bill 5, argues that drivers are company employees, entitled to minimum and overtime wages, paid sick leave, health benefits, and access to social insurance programs like unemployment.

The lawsuit also brings to a head simmering tensions of “gig economy workers, who have been at the front lines of the coronavirus  pandemic. Workers at firms that offer shopping or delivery, such as Instacart and Postmates, have complained that their low wages, determined and managed by platform algorithms, don’t accurately reflect the risks they’re taking to deliver people and goods during a public health crisis.

Elsewhere, both companies are reporting huge drops in use of their ride-share service during the pandemic – adding to the precariousness of the business model now that it is under suit as well. Stay tuned . . .

Live-streaming helped China’s farmers survive the pandemic. It’s here to stay

When coronavirus ground the country to a halt, the agricultural industry could no longer sell its produce. E-commerce giants used the chance to bring the sector online.

Amid the devastation, e-commerce giants also saw an opportunity. Farmers were desperate to try new sales channels, and consumers were being forced to shop online. An entirely new industry was there for the taking if the companies could help the farmers out.

Both JD.com and Alibaba-owned Taobao quickly launched rural live-streaming initiatives, building on the engagement-centric format that had skyrocketed in popularity in China over the previous few years. The companies helped farmers and merchants set up online stores with expedited approvals and showed them how to design the content of their broadcasts. They made their apps more intuitive and used their logistics networks to ship the products directly from farm to home.

The push was largely a bet: rural live-streaming had existed before but hadn’t truly taken off. In 2019, Taobao’s goal was to attract a mere 1,000 farmers to its platform. “Most farmers didn’t know how to live-stream; even fewer understood e-commerce,” says Zhang Guowei, the head of JD Live.

But the pressure of the crisis—and the unique scale of China’s consumer base—provided the necessary catalyst. Taobao now has over 50,000 rural live-streamers and aims for at least 200,000 more within the year. Growers who had once sold 90% of their products offline have now flipped to selling 90% online. Live-streaming has not only helped the industry weather the crisis—it’s forged an entirely new way of business that is likely to continue long after the pandemic is over. full article MIT Tech Review here . . . .

Tech Companies Keep Fighting COVID-19

A 3D printer maker switches to medical devices while an academic group creates ventilators using Home Depot parts.

From ventilators to shields to video machine repair tutorials, tech companies are on the forefront developing solutions to the Covid-19 Pandemic workplace emergencies. One company has even built safe sleep cabins to give healthcare workers a safe haven torest.

Science and Technology Online Video Lectures

Joseph Stiglitz lecturing at Columbia University: The Great Divide

The annual Linus Pauling Memorial Lectures Series takes place in Portland Oregon (Linus’s home town). The presenters each season address topics ranging over all of the sciences, engineering and related philosophies of science and engineering. the focus has been on leading-edge thinkers.

Click here to go to series of lectures on. YouTube:

Apple CEO Tim Cook calls for strong US privacy law, rips “data-industrial complex”

Cook: Tech companies should de-identify customer data or not collect it at all.

Apple CEO Tim Cook has called on the US government to pass “a comprehensive federal privacy law,” saying that tech companies that collect wide swaths of user data are engaging in surveillance.

Speaking at the International Conference of Data Protection and Privacy Commissioners (ICDPPC) in Brussels, Cook said that businesses are creating “an enduring digital profile” of each user and that the trade of such data “has exploded into a data-industrial complex.”

“This is surveillance,” Cook said. “And these stockpiles of personal data serve only to enrich the companies that collect them. This should make us very uncomfortable.”

Profits over Privacy . . . . full article: