Get Ready for the Hospital of the Future

The digital transformation of healthcare has already begun, but there is still much work to do.

Attendees of the Virtual Engineering Week keynote, “Mayo Clinic 2030: Hospital of the Future,” got a glimpse of healthcare’s future. Mark Wehde, chair, Mayo Clinic Division of Engineering, explored the increasing digitalization of healthcare and how it could lead to more patient-centric care. Mayo Clinic’s 2030 Bold Forward plan is one such effort. “The plan recognizes that digital transformation is the key to our future, and digital platforms will be crucial to enable us to provide better care to more patients. We are well into the beginning of the fourth industrial revolution—this is the digital platform revolution. Healthcare is shifting from a traditional hospital-centric care model to a more virtual distributed care model that heavily leverages the latest technologies around artificial intelligence, deep learning, data analytics, genomics, home-based healthcare, robotics, and 3D printing of tissues and implants.” full article here


2021 Tehnology Trends Foreshadowed in 2020 Tech Awards

Many 2021 predictions focus on how specific technologies will impact the way we work and how we perform product development in a COVID and post-COVID world. These trends were foreshadowed by the tech achievements awarded in 2020. The intersection between 2021 predictions and 2020 awards provides interesting insights into such life-changing areas as working-from-home (WFH), cyber-security (e.g., zoom-booming), product development, smart tech in homes and businesses, energy development, and more.

2021 may be remembered for its accelerated transition to a digital workplace, which began in response to the coronavirus pandemic.  Digital technology has shown its full potential to both simplify and amplify communication in science, business, and government via video calls, webinars, and virtual events. Overall, we probably gained three to five years in terms of the adoption of and migration to this new normal in 2020. 

This gallery showcases key engineering work styles and product development predictions for 2021, followed by the 2020 engineering and science awards that foreshadowed them. Link to article and slide show of awards here


His Invention For Renewable Energy Inspired by the Physics of Northern Lights Just Won the 2020 Dyson Prize

AuREUS System Technology

While renewable energy uptake and solutions continue to grow, many can only generate electricity in the right environmental conditions. For example, solar panels can only capture and convert visible light into renewable energy and must be facing the sun to do so. What is more, solar farms are only built horizontally, never vertically and are often placed on prime arable farmland.

The solution? Invented by 27-year-old Carvey Ehren Maigue from Mapua University in the Philippines, AuREUS System Technology is a material that can be attached to a pre-existing structure or surface. Utilizing the natural scientific principles behind the northern and southern lights, it harvests UV light and convert this into visible light to generate electricity. 

Using ultraviolet rays, the sun could be shining, or it could be cloudy: Carvey’s material will still generate electricity.  full story here


Medical Device Design: 3 Practical Tips for Great User Interface and User Experience

Virtual Engineering Week speakers from Kablooe Design share practical tips for doing great user interface and user experience (UX/UI) in medical device design. 

If user interfaces on a consumer electronic are unclear, it results in frustration and wasted time. In medical device design, if user interfaces are unclear, results could be far more serious. During BVirtual Engineering Week, During experts from Kablooe Design, a Coon Rapids, MN-based firm, shared key considerations for designing a medical device user interface (UI) and user experience (UX). Link Here


The State of Autonomous Vehicles

Tesla’s Generic Approach vs Waymo
Tesla’s beta version of Full Self Driving (FSD) software released to a small number of people

. . . . The final huge thing to point out here is Tesla’s approach to full self-driving. You might wonder what’s taking Tesla so long when there are completely autonomous vehicles on the road today from companies like Waymo, which require no human in the driver’s seat.

The reason Waymo can do this is that they use highly detailed pre-built maps that “highlight information such as curbs and sidewalks, lane markers, crosswalks, traffic lights, stop signs, and other road features.” This means they can only drive in areas that have been mapped but it gives them a detailed understanding of what the world looks like at the cars current GPS coordinates. They use cameras and lidar sensors to detect other cars, road signs and traffic light colours so the car can drive safely on public roads. . . . full article


Opinion Piece : New Technologies Should Be Regulated by Government — Not by Those Who Profit

by historian and journalist Peter Montague

Between 1972 and 1995, Congress supported its own in-house think tank called the Office of Technology Assessment, or OTA. The Congress defunded OTA in 1995, thus causing it to lose much of its capacity to foresee and forestall environmental and social harm that could be avoided or mitigated by sensible government policies and actions. During its brief existence, OTA produced 750 high-quality reports on a wide range of problems that Congress was trying to understand and resolve, such as job loss from automation, the benefits and costs of mammograms, the feasibility and cost of the Strategic Defense Initiative to shoot down incoming nuclear-armed missiles, and the accuracy and reliability of lie-detector tests.

Now Congressmen Mark Takano (D-California) and Sean Casten (D-Illinois) have proposed legislation to restore OTA . . . .

. . . The market is not going to solve the lasers-pointed-at-airplanes problem. Wall Street is not going to fix the climate emergency or control the proliferation of nuclear weapons or require that plastics be made biodegradable so they do not accumulate in the environment. Corporate managers may personally desire to be “socially responsible,” but so long as they answer to shareholders expecting a hefty return on investment, they will pursue technologies that increase their profits, regardless of their ill effects on workers, community and the natural world.

[some complain that] OTA reports are biased against the rapid introduction of new technologies, which many believe are essential for growing the economy  to avoid recession or depression. . . . technology corporations may not find it in their interests to have Congress well-informed about the pros and cons of various regulatory possibilities, so restoring OTA would almost certainly require a coordinated citizen  to make it happen.

full article


Automation and Robotics in Packaging – Oct 1, 2020

Join us for a 60-minute webinar, Automation and Robotics in Packaging, with live Q&A on Thursday, October 1 at 11:00 AM PDT / 2:00 PM EDT.

Visit a packaging trade show and what you’ll see across the floor is hundreds of robots and automated motion systems. Packaging operations have become extended automation systems that require very little manual labor. If the warehouse was the first part of manufacturing operation to go fully automated, the packaging operations are close second.

In this webinar author, robot futurist and changeover wizard John Henry will discuss how robots are currently used to automate packaging and how he expects them to be used in the future.

Click to register and obtain more information


How Much Information Is Too Much Information?

A Zocalo Public Square Event – You Tube Video Stream

The world is projected to generate 90 zettabytes of data this year and the next. That’s more than all the data produced since the arrival of computers, and if we still used DVDs, we’d need 19 trillion to store it all. Swimming in this massive sea of information, humans are easily overwhelmed; studies suggest we avoid important information because it might make us miserable, while seeking out information of dubious value to make ourselves happy.

What information do we need to know? What role should policymakers play in helping us find data that improves our well-being and filter out information—from calorie counts to credit card fees—that wastes our time or even endangers us? Harvard University legal scholar Cass Sunstein, author of “Too Much Information: Understanding What You Don’t Want To Know,” visited Zócalo and the Commonwealth Club to explain how we can make information work for us. This online streamed event was moderated by “WIRED” senior editor Lauren Goode. Read more about our panelists here: https://zps.la/3cjL6OA