Why some cities are banning facial recognition

facial recognition image

There are cameras everywhere now, even in billboards you pass. Every time you ID yourself or a friend on Facebook, you have added facial identity information to the cloud. Most airports are using it on all patrons. Security cameras employ it. Facial recognition may make police work faster and easier. But knowing that everyone’s face is being tracked 24/7, which is possible in the near future, could have a detrimental effect on people’s decisions about what they will say, where they will go (think churches, community centers, rallies . . . . ). So, not only does facial recognition have an impact on our rights of privacy, it could impact our rights of assemblage, speech and more. In addition, it is notoriously inaccurate on faces of color and women. This is something that society needs to be addressing together, while there is still time, rather than allowing a free-for-all in use by police, military, commercial security companies, advertising agencies and more. A few cities have banned their use (including San Francisco and Oakland), but there are currently no state or federal laws regulating facial recognition. Watch the video, then consider if policy intervention is needed.

Link to Wired Video Interview


Glendale Receives $1 Million to Launch Startup Accelerator

The City of Glendale has received $1 million from the state of California to launch a tech startup accelerator.

Accelerators offer mentoring, marketing, networking, investment opportunities, and other services to early-stage local tech companies seeking to progress to the “next level.”

The City is seeking feedback from startups, accelerators, and community members on how a Glendale-based accelerator would best serve them and make the greatest impact for the region. Click here to join the conversation.

A Post-Product World

In a post-product world, the digital twin becomes the instance of truth, not the physical product itself. (Source: Solidworks) - image

The manufacturing plant of the future will produce not products but experience. If you take the new the robots for mobility – self-driving cars – they’re connected machines. Where does the value come from – the chassis and four wheels – or does it come from the connected services? Those connected services are what we call the experience.

The customer seeks the service, not the product. The value to the customer is coming from the experience of using the car, not from the car itself. Those who succeed in the 21st Century will be those who provide change by offering a new type of experience. This is what makes the 21st Century different from the 20th Century. Millennials Are Ready for a Post-Product World.To some extent, the post-product world is a generational issue. Millennials get the notion that products are essentially experience. For Gen Xers and Boomers, the concept takes some getting used to. Many Millennials used shared rides during their college years. They understand the positive economics of not owning a car.The diminishing sales of CDs is another example of experience over products. My Millennial kids are perfectly content not owning any of the music they listen to, and they’ve taught their Boomer old man that CDs are a clunky way to consume music. I now have countless albums in my Amazon Prime collection. I pay a monthly fee for access, it’s far less than I used spend buying CDs. full article 


AI (Artificial Intelligence) as Job Helper Rather Than Job Usurper

There’s a fear that AI is going to take over our jobs – and with the advent of everything from self-driving cars to artificial customer service agents, it’s a valid concern. It’s especially fair when McKinsey, one of the most trusted global management consulting firms, predicts that as many as 800 million full-time employees could have their work displaced by 2030 due to automation

Yet, that data point alone is not reality. In fact, with the following statistics next to it, we can paint a much better picture for the future of work. According to the same McKinsey report: 

  • Less than 5 percent of occupations consist of activities that can be fully automated
  • In about 60 percent of occupations, only one-third of tasks could be automated 

IT professionals are certainly up for it. Because while their jobs are becoming more complex and time consuming, their numbers in business are not increasing to balance this growth. The principal value of AI in IT is that it can help predict problems rather than just react to them – i.e. prevent problems rather than just attempt to mitigate them. more at Forbes