Is it Time to Outsource Your Passwords to an App?

First, if you are storing passwords in your web browser, stop. Because storing passwords in your browser is a terrible idea! For example, If other people (like the system admin at the office) have access to your computer, they can open Chrome’s settings tab and see all of your passwords in plaintext. 

Wired Magazine suggests: “Your brain has better things to do than store secure passwords. Get a dedicated password manager to keep your login data synced and secure across all devices.

And here are some that are recommended:

Bitwarden is the most transparently secure password manager we tested; it’s built on open source code that’s subject to regular security audits. The app is also free, making it a good choice for the password-manager curious. Advanced users like the ability to study the code, and they can even host Bitwarden on their own server. The free account has no limitations, but premium accounts ($10 a year) offer extras like support for logging in with a YubiKey and advice on strengthening your passwords.

The most user-friendly service of this bunch, 1Password seamlessly integrates with login windows to autofill passwords across all your browsers and apps. This is especially true on iOS, where the procedure is smoother than it is on other platforms. Features like Travel Mode, which automatically deletes sensitive data from devices before you go on a trip, and Watchtower, which identifies weak or reused passwords, help justify the cost: $36 a year for one user, $60 for the whole family. . . . full article

Public Sector Training Partnerships Build Power

From building trades apprenticeships to the Culinary Academy of Las Vegas’ casino and hospitality worker training, labor-management partnerships are well regarded for their ability to connect private sector workers to high-paying jobs while ensuring that employers receive a steady stream of well-qualified employees. Yet, policymakers and advocates often pay less attention to existing partnerships between unionized public sector workers and their employers, despite the fact that these workers now account for about half of all union members and that there is a long history of public sector partnerships providing professional development opportunities to workers.1

By expanding the use of public sector labor-management training partnerships, policymakers and unions can help government employers and unions work together to solve challenges and deliver good results for workers, employers, and the public. Labor-management partnerships—independent organizations that unions and employers jointly control—allow partners to collaboratively design and manage workforce training, professional learning, and apprenticeship opportunities. Research finds that these sorts of programs can help employers recruit and retain skilled workers; improve work quality; boost productivity; and strengthen employee relations.2 Public sector training programs are also being used to increase the diversity of the public sector workforce; ensure that government is ready to serve diverse populations; and provide a pathway to a good job for workers, particularly those who face  multiple barriers to finding employment.

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The State of the U.S. Labor Market: Pre-September 2019 Jobs Release

  1. The unemployment rate remains high for young workers.
  2. Younger workers are more likely to work part time for economic reasons
  3. As school enrollment continues to rise, the labor force participation rate for 16- to 22-year-olds continues to decline
  4. Choosing to pursue an education over work experience may come with risks and trade-offs; the college debt burden continues to swell while the body of research on college food insecurity grows.
  5. As anxieties and predictions about the future of work abound, it is crucial that researchers avoid overlooking the young workers who will eventually enter the labor force.

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Board Meetings October 9, 2019

The VWDB Board and Executive Committees will meet on October 9, 2019. Executive Committee at 8:00am and Full Board at 8:30am

Location: Verdugo Jobs Center, Suites A, B, and C , 1255 S. Central Ave, Glendale 91204 

RSVP  dantonioATglendaleca.gov RSVP to: (818) 937-8081

Click here for the Executive Committee Meeting Minutes and Agenda.

Click here for the Full Board Meeting Minutes and Agenda

3rd Annual Disability Resource Fair in Glendale, CA on October 23, 2019

The Verdugo Jobs Center/Work Incentives Planning and Assistance (WIPA) program in collaboration with the Employment Development Department (EDD), Glendale Department of Rehabilitation (DOR), and State Council on Developmental Disabilities (SCDD) would like to invite you to the 3rd Annual Disability Resource Fair on October 23, 2019.

The Disability Resource Fair is featuring the State Council on Developmental Disability (SCDD) who will be presenting a film clip highlighting employed people with disabilities’ success stories and sharing other resources to encourage and empower the disabled population within the community to return to the workforce

When: Wednesday, October 23, 2019 from 10AM-12 NOON

Where: 1255 South Central Ave., Glendale, CA 91204

RSVP: 818-937-8020

Employers Used Facebook to Keep Women and Older Workers From Seeing Job Ads

The Federal Government Thinks That’s Illegal.

In a first, the U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission has ruled that companies violated civil rights law through their use of Facebook’s targeting advertising.

Two years ago, ProPublica and The New York Times revealed that companies were posting discriminatory job ads on Facebook, using the social network’s targeting tools to keep older workers from seeing employment opportunities. Then we reported companies were using Facebook to exclude women from seeing job ads. Experts told us that it was most likely illegal. And it turns out the federal government now agrees. A group of recent rulings by the U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission found “reasonable cause” to conclude that seven employers violated civil rights protections by excluding women or older workers or both from seeing job ads they posted on Facebook. full article